Article Obsessed

It must be said: I love the New York Times online. Probably to an unhealthy degree. Actually, I know it’s unhealthy because I used to say, “oh, just messing around on the internet,” when asked what I was doing while reading the Times. But, they say admitting your addiction is the first step, and I’ve recently started responding, “Reading the New York Times,” to the aforementioned question. Sure, I may sound snobby, but all of us on this blog have long since stopped considering that a problem.

If you’re short on time, you can usually find the highlights of the day in the little sidebar of “Most Popular: Emailed” (or, the page itself is here). Not only is it a good way to find both informative and entertaining stories, but it’s an interesting social experiment is seeing what the bizarre-minded American public finds appealing. You’ll quickly find yourself falling into that category as well, with such articles as “Friends With Benefits, and Stress Too,” “Albania Custom Fades: Woman as the Family Man,” “The 11 Best Foods You Aren’t Eating,” and “Would Stonehenge Be Built Today?” I kid you not. Your friends will love you. Or stop answering your emails. Either or.

Today has many highlights on the NYTimes.com sidebar, but I think my favorite may be this article about cruise ship art auctions. Seriously? Who knew. I’m sure our resident art expert, Kaks, will have something to say about this. Particularly since the article focuses on informing us about the potentially fraudulent nature of the auctions held by cruise-auction giant Park West Gallery. This is very important for those of us who often go on cruises and spend $90,000 on a piece of art. Wouldn’t want to buy a potentially fake Picasso for five times its normal price.

My favorite part is how the author manages to be slightly mocking and tongue-in-cheek about the whole affair while still putting together a credible article. Gotta love the Times.

Kak’s editor’s note: I actually commented on this cruise ship auction article on my art market blog…great minds read alike.

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